How to include material after the letter in newlfm

How to include material after the letter in newlfm 25 November 2018

TL;DR: If you want to include additional material after the closing of a newlfm letter, forget the builtin \restletter commands. Add \newcommand\closelfm{\closlfm\let\closlfm\relax} to your letrinfo.tex file, put \closelfm where you want to end the letter (optionally followed by a \newpage), then write the additional material using standard LaTeX markup.

I use the newlfm LaTeX package for all letters I write, personal and professional. It has some nice advantages over the standard letter document class: you can have a database of different sender and recipient addresses, signatures and letterheads; it's easy to create custom letterheads that include images; you can have the correct letterhead and signature selected automatically based on sender or recipient. And many other features I don't make use of.

I have a love-hate relationship with this package, though. It has some quirks/bugs, especially to do with page layout and spacing. And whilst the documentation is extensive, it's not always the clearest. Whenever I need to do anything slightly different to what I've done before with newlfm, getting it to do what I want typically involves hours of effort and frustration the first time around, and I often ending up resorting to ugly kludges to get the letter written without wasting too much time. (This probably says more about my limitations, than those of the package.) Nonetheless, once you have a letter layout configured just the way you want, writing new letters with the same layout with newlfm is a breeze.

I was recently writing a cover letter to accompany the revisions I was submitting to one of my research papers. I wanted to attach the detailed response to the referees' comments after the letter (which contained a lot of mathsso was best written in LaTeX too). The easy thing would have been to write the cover letter using newlfm, write the review response as a separate LaTeX document using some other document class, and stitch the two PDFs together using the pdftk command-line tool (or similar). But having to write these as two separate documents bugged me. I was already writing the cover letter in LaTeX. Why not just write the detailed referee response in the same LaTeX document?

LaTeX: Cleveref package

LaTeX: Cleveref package 18 October 2018 The Cleveref package (also available from CTAN) does clever things with cross-references:

  • automatic formatting of cross-references based on the type of object referred to (chapter, section, equation, theorem, etc.);
  • full control and customisation of the reference format;
  • cross-references and page references to multiple items;
  • automatic (optional) sorting and compression of multiple cross-references or page references;
  • optional output of a sed script that can strip out Cleveref commands and replace them with standard LaTeX, allowing Cleveref to be used e.g. in articles sent to journals or collaborators that don't (yet!) support Cleveref.

A number of other LaTeX packages provide similar features. Some are venerable enough to be documented in The LaTeX Companion, or even included in the standard LaTeX distribution itself. But all those that I've come across provide only a subset of the Cleveref features. (See the Introduction to the package documentation for some comparisons.)

LaTeX: Quantum package

LaTeX: Quantum package 2 October 2012 The Quantum package defines a number of commands and short-hands useful when writing about quantum mechanics, and quantum information theory in particular.

There is no separate documentation; read the package source to find out what commands it provides.

  • Quantum package

LaTeX: Authord package

LaTeX: Authord package 27 July 2012 Gives a complete solution to the problem of precedence in scientific pubication, in a way that Don Knuth would surely approve of.

  • Authord package
  • Authord documentation